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Music

The High Priestess of Soul

 The High Priestess of Soul

Nina Simone was a musical prodigy and civil rights activist whose iconic voice and style shaped the sound of modern jazz and soul. Cristen and Caroline explore the tempestuous woman behind the artistic legend and how racism compelled and complicated her career. See more »

Life as a Lady Music Producer

 Life as a Lady Music Producer

Do women music producers bring something different to the recording studio? Sylvia Massy thinks so. Cristen and Caroline ask the platinum-record-earning producer about her stellar career working with the likes of Prince and Tool and how gender has influenced her life in the control room. See more »

STEM Women Hall of Fame:  The Mother of Electronic Music

 STEM Women Hall of Fame: The Mother of Electronic Music

Arguably the mother of electronic music, Daphne Oram co-founded and directed the BBC's Radiophonic Workshop, one of the most famous electronic music studios ever. And though her abstract sounds might not please all ears, Oram's persistent passion for making her namesake noise and building her own synthesizers is a timeless lesson of a woman fighting to do what she loves. See more »

Electronic Women

 Electronic Women

Whether playing the theremin or crafting soundscapes for your favorite TV shows, women have shaped the electronic music industry from the beginning. Cristen and Caroline examine the role of these synth pioneers and women's place in today's billion-dollar electronic scene. See more »

Dolly Parton: A Razzle-Dazzle Retrospective

 Dolly Parton: A Razzle-Dazzle Retrospective

On January 19, 1946, Dolly Parton was born in Locust Ridge, TN, and at age seven, little Dolly made herself a guitar and started strumming. Behind the big hair, big breasts and big country glitz, Dolly Parton has achieved one of the most successful, award-winning careers in music history, all the while remaining one of the most likeable celebrities from Nashville to Hollywood. Her secret? A lot of hard work and hairspray. For a more in-depth look at this incredible career woman and entertainment icon, listen to our Dollytastic podcast, "The Ballad of Dolly Parton." See more »

Why take Taylor Swift seriously?

 Why take Taylor Swift seriously?

One of the most powerful women in the music industry, Taylor Swift has amassed global legion of fans through her catchy songwriting, social media savvy and star-studded dating history. Cristen and Caroline take a look at the country princess-turned-pop powerhouse's incredible career and why her critics ignore her talent. See more »

Why Breakup Songs Hurt So Good

 Why Breakup Songs Hurt So Good

Humans have pretty low emotional pain tolerances, and research has shown that people instinctively seek out distractions away from sources of whatever unpleasantness ails, hence the indefatigable sales of alcohol and ice cream. When trouble arises in interpersonal relationships, the heartbroken also often spend time wallowing in the negativity, perhaps playing Bon Iver's "For Emma" on repeat as though intentionally keeping the waterworks faucet turned up to full blast (not that I've ever done anything like that ever...). See more »

Beyonce's Feminism

 Beyonce's Feminism

The release of Beyonce's secret 'visual album' in December 2013 was hailed as her feminist manifesto, setting off an Internet-wide discussion about the mega-star's public image versus her personal politics. Cristen and Caroline weigh in on the pop cultural significance of Beyonce's feminism. See more »

Noisy Women: America's First "All-Girl" Bands

 Noisy Women: America's First "All-Girl" Bands

When Sherrie Tucker set out to write her book, "Swift Shift: 'All-Girl' Bands of the 1940s," it took some herculean digging to unearth the stories of [insert band name] and others who played during the World War II era and thus rectify the revisionist history that formerly assumed that the talent women were somehow subpar substitute for their male musical counterparts who were off fighting. "When all-girl bands appear, they are frequently buried under unspoken definitions that take all-man bands to be normal and all-woman bands to be novelties," Tucker writes. Over at Amoeba Music's blog, Eric Brightwell explains how until the 20th century, professional female musicians were a rarity. Until then, women's musical roles were largely limited to vocals, piano and harp. But starting as early as the 1910s, some female musicians began striking out on their own, forming and joining up with early all-women groups like these in the decades leading up to the reign of rock 'n' roll. See more »