Right Now in Stuff Mom Never Told You

LA Times Lends a Double Meaning to "Support"

Molly and I often dissect women- and gender-related topics down to their most granular details on Stuff Mom Never Told You. But we also try to maintain a sense of humor while studying and analyzing cultural portrayals of women, and sometimes we've just gotta look and laugh at certain slip-ups.

Autistic spectrum disorders are typically associated with boys, a fact which may make it harder for girls with autism to be diagnosed properly. In this episode, Molly and Cristen define autism and discuss how it manifests differently in boys and girls.

In today's episode, Molly and Cristen tackle one of the biggest gender stereotypes out there: Men are better drivers than women.

Presumably as more women elect to postpone building families in favor of building careers, the age of childbearing women continues to rise, the Guardian reports. While the average maternal age has only climbed about a year from 28.4 years old to 29.4 years old over the past decade, the number of women having kids in their 40s has shown dramatic growth in England and Wales.

There's been a lot of breast-related news lately, from a controversial bra ad to a popular Internet meme. What's the big deal about boobs? Molly and Cristen explore the history, politics and symbolism of breasts in this episode.

The Food and Drug Administration may be on its way to approving the first prescription drug intended to boost women's libidos. I'd like to think this has come about since some FDA officials were listening in to Molly's and my discussion about filbanserin, nicknamed "pink Viagra," in a Stuff Mom Never Told You episode a couple weeks ago, but I'm probably overstating our clout. For now, anyway.

Pharmaceutical company Novartis learned just how much a glass ceiling in the workplace can cost. Ballpark: $1 billion.

Although men's studies is already an established academic discipline, a new discipline has recently emerged that aims to focus exclusively on the male gender. Molly and Cristen explore what makes male studies so different from men's in this episode.

The nonprofit group Save the Children recently released its 11th annual Mothers' Index of 160 countries, and the United States doesn't even hold a slot in the top 10. Instead, the U.S. comes in at 28 on the list, which is based on national resources and services that support mothers and their children on all rungs of the socioeconomic ladder.

In last Friday's Guardian, Kira Cochrane lamented the minimal gains made by women politicians at the polls. Once the dust had finally settled on the parliamentary elections, only 16 new female representatives picked up seats, boosting the percentage of women MPs to just 22 percent. And to top it off, Prime Minister David Cameron appointed just four women among his 23-person cabinet.

Although they're ubiquitous on today's beaches, bikinis are a far cry from the modest, cumbersome swimming costumes women used to wear. Molly and Cristen discuss the history and feminist implications of the world's skimpiest swimwear in this episode.

In this episode, Molly and Cristen talk about feminist role models in children's literature, specifically citing three beloved children's series as examples of literature that provides strong role models for girls.

Assuming they want to be together 'til death do they part, men who marry younger women live longer. Statistically, if he weds someone seven to nine years his junior, he has an 11 percent lower mortality risk. Now, a study of more than 2 million Danish couples has uncovered another compelling correlation between spousal age and longevity.

Wilma Mankiller was the first female to be elected Chief of the Cherokee Nation. Molly and Cristen celebrate the life and accomplishments of Mankiller and discuss the role of feminism in American Indian communities in this episode.

The big question I'm looking to answer (which Molly and I addressed as part of our "Why does the sizzle fizzle?" podcast) is whether love is blind. Do we have any choice in the people we're attracted to and pursue for the long-term? The short answer, according to Gallup, is no.

To some, facial hair simply represents a man's style or shaving preferences. But others argue that facial hair symbolizes masculinity. Molly and Cristen explore a topic that's close to their male listeners' hearts (and faces) in this episode.

Some countries and political parties mandate quotas to help increase female representation in government. But do these quotas truly foster equality and benefit women? Molly and Cristen weigh the pros and cons of political quotas for women in this episode.

Viagra effectively treats male sexual dysfunction, so could a similar drug be developed for women? Molly and Cristen discuss current research on a Viagra-like drug for women -- and whether it would really be beneficial -- in this episode.

It's refreshing to run across new studies like this one from Pennsylvania State University that poke holes in the kneejerk theory that in relationships, men are ultimately motivated by sex and women live for love. That idea especially came up while Molly and I were researching for our episode on whether men and women cheat for different reasons. Time and again, the studies seemed to condense women down to soul mate-seekers straight out of Debra Messing movies, while the men play sex-hungry beasts.

The Enneagram Personality Test evaluates a person's character based on nine different personality types and a geometric figure called an enneagram. Molly, Cristen and a special guest take a closer look at the enneagram and the nine types in this episode.