cooking

Even More Cooking Shows

Our listeners always come through with recommendations for further reading -- and in this case, further watching. After our episodes on The Gendered Chef and Cooking Shows, you guys wrote in about the shows and chefs you never miss.

Mrs. Goodfellow's Famous Cooking School

Meet a woman who's responsible for not only passing along a love of cooking and baking to her students, but also launching the country's first enduring cooking school: Elizabeth Baker Goodfellow.

Cooking Shows

In 1963, Julia Child made an omelet on Boston public television and changed culinary history forever. Cristen and Caroline cook up how television cooking gave rise to celebrity chefs who brought a new generation of cooking women into our homes for better -- or burnt.

Why is Thanksgiving on a Thursday?

The Anthropology of Pie

Pie is an ancient food that began as a utilitarian and often inedible necessity and evolved over centuries into its current role as a sweet treat and dessert nemesis of cake. Cristen and Caroline get in the holiday cooking spirit by examining the anthropology of pie as well as its many gendered layers.

Turnspit Dogs: The Elizabethan Must-Have Kitchen Appliance

In the 16th century, folks kept dogs around more for function rather than form, shepherding sheep, sniffing out game and warming up chilly laps. Also around that time, a certain breed of dog also found a role as the culinary workhorses of large kitchens. Enter the turnspit dog, bred with a long, stocky body and short legs (like fluffier Dachshunds) that kept upper class Elizabethan meats a-turning in the hearth.

Traditionally, cooking has been considered a female task. Yet in the professional realm, men predominate. Why? Do men and women cook food differently? Molly and Cristen explore gender issues in the culinary world in this episode.