labor

How Jenny Yang is making space for Asian women in comedy

B shares a few laughs funny lady Jenny Yang and talks through how to make comedy more inclusive.

Will #TimesUp help curb sexual harassment?

In the wake of #MeToo, hundreds of Hollywood A-listers are fighting back against sexual misconduct.

Classic Episode: The Secret History of International Women's Day

International Women's Day, celebrated every March 8, is a holiday inspired by factory women going on strike for better wages and working conditions. Cristen and Caroline explore why the (sometimes fake) history of the commemorative day is central to working-class issues within feminism then and now.

Dolores Huerta's Grassroots Legacy

Labor and Chicano civil rights activist Dolores Huerta made history organizing underpaid farmworkers and exposing the plight of the people who feed American families. Cristen and Caroline celebrate her grassroots passion that defied gender and cultural barriers and continues to inspire.

Farmer Janes

Being a farmer's wife used to be the pinnacle role for women in agriculture, but that's changing fast. As more women reclaim land and run farms, Cristen and Caroline highlight how they're becoming seen as the rising gatekeepers of sustainable food production.

Did WW2 really help Rosie the Riveters?

World War II often is cited as a watershed moment for getting American women in the workplace. To commemorate D-Day, Cristen and Caroline reexamine whether the war really helped Rosie the Riveters climb career ladders.

How Unfair Labor Sparked International Women's Day

International Women's Day has come and gone, but its annual message ought to be reiterated every day. No, I'm not talking about feminism per say, although I'm all about gender equality. Many folks might assume that March 8 (International Women's Day) traces back to our foremothers' fight for equal votes, but its history actually stems from the Socialist Party and early 20th-century labor movements...

Women Are Secretaries, Men Are Truck Drivers

Widely circulated U.S. Census data have revealed that the most common job for American women in 2010 was the same as it was in 1950.