sheryl sandberg

Lean In + SMNTY: Why is "bossy" a bad word?

In her hilarious and insightful memoir "Bossypants," Tina Fey shares how people demonstrate a peculiar befuddlement with her professional authority. She writes: "Ever since I became an executive producer of '30 Rock,' people have asked me ... 'Is it uncomfortable for you to be the person in charge?' You know, in the same way they say, 'Gosh, Mr. Trump, is it awkward for you to be the boss of all these people?" And of course people might assume that Fey is "uncomfortable" being the boss because that title doesn't often attract many kindly descriptors if you're a woman.

Lean In + SMNTY: The Workplace Fear Factor

In 1978, Oberlin psychologists Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes coined the term "impostor syndrome" to describe an underlying feeling of being a fraud that often results in undercutting one's accomplishments. In part two of our four-part series on Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg's "Lean In," Caroline and I unpack the imposter syndrome in the workplace and explore how to banish that fear because it seems to particularly affect successful women. Sandberg writes that she first heard about imposter syndrome while attending a speech called "Feeling Like a Fraud" by Dr. Peggy McIntosh from the Wellesley Centers for Women, and she later told Salon, "I believe that had I not heard that speech, I would not have the job that I have."

Lean In + SMNTY: How to Negotiate Like a Woman

Way back when in 2009, one of the early episodes of Stuff Mom Never Told You on the topic of women and negotiation struck a major chord with me. The gist of it was dismal: working women don't negotiate their salaries nearly as much or as aggressively as men do, and I was one of those working women. Up until that point, I hadn't done a good job negotiating for myself, and even though I relatively fresh out of college, it was a stinging realization because it felt like I was already off on the wrong foot -- or at least the lower-earning foot...