discrimination

The First Lady of the Black Press

When trailblazing reporter Ethel Payne died, The Washington Post eulogized that had Payne "not been black, she certainly would have been one of the most recognized journalists in American society." Cristen and Caroline uncover the history and significance of black newspapers in the U.S. and the incredible legacy of one its brightest stars.

The Anita Hill Effect

In 1991, Anita Hill testified before the U.S. Senate that then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her when they worked together. Cristen and Caroline talk about the significance, gender and racial dynamics, and lasting impact of Hill's public hearing that captivated the nation.

ChangeMAKERS: No Dream Is Off Limits

Shifting from corporate America to the New York Fire Department proved to be a major culture shock for Regina Wilson. Upon joining the force in 1999, she became the 12th African-American woman in the FDNY's history and now is the first female president of the Vulcan Society, the African-American fraternal organization founded in 1940 to combat racial discrimination among firefighters. In the final ChangeMAKERS installment, Cristen and Caroline learn about Wilson's battle against sexism and hostility -- one she wages in order to do the job she loves and bring other women and people of color along behind her.

Feminist Transphobia

"Trans-exclusionary radical feminists," or TERFs, is considered a slur. Yet, some radical feminists who define womanhood through biology rather than gender identity exist. Cristen and Caroline explore how this transphobia has impacted feminism, women's colleges and public perceptions of what radical feminism means.

When America's "Ugly Laws" Hid the Disabled Poor From the Public Eye

First passed in San Francisco in 1867 -- Order No. 783. To Prohibit Street Begging, and to Restrain Certain Persons from Appearing in Streets and Public Places -- "ugly laws" forbade visibly disabled poor people from panhandling and generally occupying public spaces. Cities around the country including Portland, Denver and New Orleans followed San Francisco's lead...

The Chess Queens

Chess, one of history's oldest games, is considered a man's game -- but why? Cristen and Caroline examine how the queen piece revolutionized chess and subsequently kicked women players out of the sport.

The Short Guy Stigma

Women & Online Harrassment